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Inside a Chocolate Factory

Quality Control Process

When cocoa arrives at the manufacturing facility, the cocoa beans are inspected and approved as part of a stringent quality control process.

VIDEO: Quality Control Process (1 Min.)

Video: Quality Assurance in the Chocolate Factory

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Bean Processing

After inspection and thorough cleaning, the beans are ready to be processed.  The first step is roasting.  Cocoa Beans are roasted in large, rotating cylinders.  This process develops the aroma, flavor and rich color of chocolate.  Roasted beans are cracked open to reveal the nib.  Finally, nibs are ground into a non-alcholic liquid called chocolate liquor - the main ingredient in chocolate. 

VIDEO: Bean Processing (30 Sec.)

Video: Cocoa Bean Processing

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Cocoa Processing

To make cocoa powder, the chocolate liquor is placed into giant hydraulic presses that squeeze out the cocoa butter. The pressed cake that remains after the cocoa butter is removed can be cooled, pulverized and sifted into COCOA POWDER.

VIDEO: Cocoa Processing (30 Sec.)

Video: Making Cocoa Powder

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Making Chocolate

The art of chocolate making requires carefully mixing a variety of ingredients into the chocolate liquor. The chocolate mixture is then finely ground, or refined, by passing between a series of heavy rollers set one on top of the other. Cocoa butter and other ingredients such as milk and sugar are added to the chocolate.  During conching, heavy rollers swirl continually through the mixture, developing the texture and flavor. Before it's ready, the chocolate must be tempered. This involves heating, cooling and re-heating the mixture.  The finished product can be used a variety of ways including pouring it into molds or using it to enrobe a candy center such as caramel, creams or nuts. 

VIDEO: Chocolate for Eating (1 Min., 30 Sec.)

Video: Making Chocolate to Eat

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